kalelthekonfident:

dynastylnoire:

chauvinistsushi:

i’m sad

Things I don’t do on st. patrick’s day

Go Downtown

Go on the Southside

Go to Oakland

basically I avoid all places where there will be drunk white folks in mass because they are worse that high school teens in a hall way on the way to lunch. They give no fucks and will walk all over you. 

They will walk if not run infront of moving vehicles 

my deductible is too high and I’ve never been to jail. I will keep my black ass on my side of town where it’s safe. 

Church in 2012 a cop got mad at me for jay walking on the Southside but wading saying shit to the dude who left right out the bar and did the same thing as me laugh and drunk as shit



grrlyman:

you casually admit that you sexually assaulted your partner like it never happened. youre a hypocrite. you should post your picture and shame yourself the way you shame others who are just ACCUSED of doing the same thing. you dont even take responsiblity for your behavior but instead blame your partner’s racism for “leading you to drink, which lead you to assault her”. scum.  - submitted on anon

I’ve never thought that my ex’s racism was responsible for my drinking. I chose to drink instead of leaving. That was my choice.

I’ve processed a lot about what the appropriate measures would be to ensure others can keep themselves safe. I’ve been unsure about explaining the details because this isn’t only my story to tell, and the response I’ve gotten in person has been pretty dismissive. My abusiveness is the scariest, most challenging thing I’ve had to recover from, as a survivor of rape and abuse. It’s changed the way I feel about myself, as it should.

I’ve sexually assaulted women on two separate occasions when I was fucked up(one time was on ketamin and alcohol, one time black out drunk). The first time I was 20, and we were making out on the kitchen floor of a party. She told me to stop but I kept kissing her. She pushed me away and I immediately realized what I’d done.

The second time was in my most recent relationship. I was passed out, and I woke up wanting to have sex. She told me she said no, but that I kept pushing and that she eventually consented. She has complicated feelings about that night, and has been comfortable with us using the word coercion, though she insists the sex was consensual. She informed me of this incident after we broke up over her racism.

Here is my picture.

image

Everyone has a right to keep themselves safe.

Reblogging to update the picture.

image


cartoontribute:

#4 The Powerpuff Girls - by Giovana Medeiros

cartoontribute:

#4 The Powerpuff Girls - by Giovana Medeiros

(via kyssthis16)


10 Warning Signs for POC in Interracial Relationships

reverseracism:

1. If your significant other claims to, or is known to “have a thing” for men/women of your race.

This is called fetishism, which generally consists of sexual/physical attraction based on stereotypes. For example: the “exotic” Asian/African women stereotype, the sexually potent Black male stereotype… If you’re with someone who just is “into” people of your culture, try asking them why. 

2. If they have a friend with racist views.
Birds of a feather typically flock together, and when it comes to things like this, the rule still applies.

3. If they don’t check (educationally confront) those friends when they express those views.
What you fail to speak against, is what you ALLOW to happen… I’ll leave it at that.

4. If they don’t bring you around family members.
This is sometimes done to shield significant others from discrimination of family members… But beware, the mentalities of family members can be infectious…

5. If they are ignorant of, or not making an effort to learn about you or the history/experiences of people of your ethnicity/culture.
Anyone who truly loves/appreciates a person will go out of their way to learn about the cultures which produced this person. That’s a no-brainer. When a person doesn’t make the effort to learn about the societal factors which shape the life of their significant other… that is a problem.

6. If they claim to be “colorblind”, or that “race doesn’t matter” or any of that other so-called post-racial, fake liberal B.S.

A person who says this is lying. They’re not saying that race doesn’t matter to them…. they’re saying that deep analysis of such topics make them uncomfortable and for their sake they’d rather just ignore any differences. As the saying goes “being blind to race is just ignoring something that you already noticed.” 

7. If you refer to dating them, or they refer to dating you as “trying something new”.

Doesn’t sound right to me… If you want to “try something new” try a new pair of shoes, or a new show on Netflix… But you don’t romantically try other ethnicities as if they’re flavors of Ice Cream, you experience people for who they are.

8. If you seem to be the only person of your race that they are fond of.

Do I need to explain this one?

9. If they cosign your criticisms of your ethnicity

I’ m not really a person who is big on criticizing members of my race when I’m around people outside of my race. Some discussions should stay “in the house” metaphorically speaking. But if you must talk about these kinds of these, your significant other should just be a listening ear. Anything more is out of line.

10. If they cannot, will not, are afraid to, or unable to have discussions on racism.

This is a symptom of a person who is living in denial, ignorance, or both. Either way, it ain’t healthy… Unless you’re in denial too, then y’all will probably get along fine.

(via yrmomschesthair)



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Lupita Nyong’o attends the Non-Stop premiere on February 24th, 2014

(via sugahwaatah)