janetmock:

This little seen documentary (sacrilege that there’s only 7,321 views!) is a testament to a legend, someone who has left an indelible mark on those she touched, entertained, loved, gave to, received from, crashed with, said hello to, babysat and fought for. 

Marsha P. Johnson, how you inspire me everyday to step even further into who I am and find that slice of freedom we all deserve. Thank you for always coming from a place of compassion, kindness, love, and yes glitter and flowers. 

Pay It No Mind - The Life and Times of Marsha P. Johnson


janetmock:

This little seen documentary (sacrilege that there’s only 7,321 views!) is a testament to a legend, someone who has left an indelible mark on those she touched, entertained, loved, gave to, received from, crashed with, said hello to, babysat and fought for. 

Marsha P. Johnson, how you inspire me everyday to step even further into who I am and find that slice of freedom we all deserve. Thank you for always coming from a place of compassion, kindness, love, and yes glitter and flowers. 

Pay It No Mind - The Life and Times of Marsha P. Johnson


hierophilic:

KILL YOUR RAPIST

hierophilic:

KILL YOUR RAPIST


For my inner black girl

I cried for about 30 minutes today after watching the video of Lil Reese assaulting a woman while a room full of people, excepting one other woman, stood around and did nothing. It took me about 10 minutes to get through the video because it was so hard for me to watch. I, like so many people who’ve experienced black womanhood, understand exactly what it feels like to have someone with privilege over you harm you while others do nothing. I’ve been assaulted by cops, doctors, teachers, family, friends, strangers, and it has overwhelmingly been done in public spaces with witnesses who did nothing. The majority of those who assaulted me were white men, but as the video and the recent viral video with the bus driver beating a female passenger show, the violence is condoned because the victim is a black woman.

I think this is one of the reasons it was so hard for me to come to terms with being trans. My life as a black woman was, and is, the predominate factor in who I am. The treatment I received crushed me, made me turn my hate inward, almost killed me, but the lucky fact is that I survived, and I’m stronger and happier now than those who hurt me when I was small or held down, drugged or otherwise not able to fight back. I get my strength from black women, from our struggle, beauty, and our brilliance. The pain of giving up black girlhood is almost as challenging as the pain of dysphoria.

I don’t identify as male, but I receive male privilege. I’ve been taking testosterone for almost a year, and the way people have begun to treat me in public, even when I’m wearing gold hot pants, is dramatically more respectful than when I was being perceived as a woman. I haven’t heard someone call me a fag or a dyke in public in almost a year. It’s been about six months since a man in a public space has followed me and attempted to touch me without my consent. In work settings I no longer have to fight to be heard - people are already listening(this is because my workplace is nearly all black).

My biggest struggle with these changes is that I’m complicit in them. I am responsible in any interaction with others that contains sexism. While my femininity definitely places me in a lower position in the social hierarchy and has made me a target in many settings, the thing I’ve learned is that when I’m being read as a man others are constantly giving me chances to prove that I’m a man by participating in sexism. Because of this, I’m constantly fighting for the black girl inside of me.

This is why I can’t give up my inner black girl. I need her to keep me accountable. She has lived experience, 25 years of being considered much less than human, even by those she seeks community with(black men, white queers). It’s my inner black girl who doesn’t take shit anymore, who learned that she is her own savior, her own hero. While people will still try to hurt us, physically and otherwise, she’s the part of me that can’t ever be broken. I’m grateful that she lived through what no child should have to, and I’ll spend my life defending her for what she’s done for me.


“Mother,” I slowly repeated in Korean. “I am not a boy. I am a girl. I am transgender.” My face reddened, and tears blurred my vision. I braced myself for her rejection and the end to a relationship that had only begun.

Silence again filled the room. I searched my mother’s eyes for any signs of shock, disgust or sadness. But a serene expression lined her face as she sat with ease on the couch. I started to worry that my words had been lost in translation. Then my mother began to speak.

“Mommy knew,” she said calmly through my friend, who looked just as dumbfounded as I was by her response. “I was waiting for you to tell me.”

“What? How?”

“Birth dream,” my mother replied. In Korea some pregnant women still believe that dreams offer a hint about the gender of their unborn child. “I had dreams for each of your siblings, but I had no dream for you. Your gender was always a mystery to me.”

I wanted to reply but didn’t know where to begin. My mother instead continued to speak for both of us. “Hyun-gi,” she said, stroking my head. “You are beautiful and precious. I thought I gave birth to a son, but it is OK. I have a daughter instead.”

Andy Marra, The Beautiful Daughter: How My Korean Mother Gave Me the Courage to Transition

such a beautiful story. as a queer person, waiting is filled with anxiety about what to say, how much of myself and my life would i be able to reveal? the fear of rejection is so huge, but i also desperately want my family to know me, my life, my trials, my triumphs.

i just want to look into someone’s eyes and see myself, feel like i look like someone, like i can see where i came from. i want to know if i am an oppa or hyung.

i want to know if i had a name.

i have heard all the stories, all the possibilities from bad to good that can happen when you find your birth family. but this…this is the best. the absolute best.

(via glittergeek)


jonesinforjosie:

freedominwickedness:

wanderlustprince:

When I created my list of trans* douchebaggery to help educate and inform others about common trans* roles models and their bigotry, I got quite a few requests to make a list of influential trans* people - real role models, so to speak.

The following is an incomplete list of folks that I believe have proven to be reliable, non-oppressive members and advocates of the trans* community:

  • Kate Bornstein
  • Leslie Feinberg
  • Stephen Ira
  • Marsha P. Johnson
  • Christine Jorgensen
  • Isis King
  • Jiz Lee
  • Janet Mock
  • Virginia Prince
  • Sylvia Rivera
  • Monica Roberts
  • Ryan Sallans
  • JD Samson
  • Julia Serano
  • Dean Spade

If a person I have listed has been proven to be problematic in some way, feel free to let me know (with sources, if possible). Also, if I am forgetting anyone that you think should be on this list, feel free to tell me someone who you feel should be here. To be added to this list, a person must identify under the trans* umbrella. (Please include their full name and why you think they should be added.)

Hopefully, I will have the post up by tomorrow night - including more folks and why they are a part of the list (i.e. achievements, activism, etc.)

Julia Serano is problematic in that she’s a white binary trans woman who does a very good job of analyzing oppressions which are within her personal experience … but also pretty much completely fails to consider any oppressions and intersectionalities outside her personal experience.

Her book Whipping Girl is an excellent analysis of the intersection of sexism and transphobia, but considers no other intersections whatsoever, and completely erases the existence of nonbinary and/or genderqueer trans people. She’s not an HBSer type as far as I’m aware, but her model of trans identities is pretty exclusively focused on the assumed norm of white binary trans people.

Overall, her work is something that I would feel comfortable pointing people to, but not without mentioning the caveats up front.

Actually, Seranno often says in Whipping Girl that nonbinary people are privileged in the community, and that “binarism” is the discrimination *against* binary identities



msamberhazard:

msamberhazard:

transqueersxxx:

Check out our live webcam show!
Photo by Ned Mayhem
Follow us on Twitter!

Woah! Forgot I submitted this! 133 notes O_O

249 notes! Holy shit y’all! <3
BY THE WAY! We’ve set up a Skype account for private shows! ^_^
Username: TwoHungTGirls

 Get Skype
(NOTE: the buttons may not work if viewed from the Dashboard; view the actual post on my blog if this is the case)
Don’t forget to check us out on Streamate!

msamberhazard:

msamberhazard:

transqueersxxx:

Check out our live webcam show!

Photo by Ned Mayhem

Follow us on Twitter!

Woah! Forgot I submitted this! 133 notes O_O

249 notes! Holy shit y’all! <3

BY THE WAY! We’ve set up a Skype account for private shows! ^_^

Username: TwoHungTGirls

Add me to Skype

My status
Get Skype

(NOTE: the buttons may not work if viewed from the Dashboard; view the actual post on my blog if this is the case)

Don’t forget to check us out on Streamate!

(via msamberhazard-deactivated201210)


reclaimingthelatinatag:

Sylvia Rivera (2 July 1951 – 19 February 2002) was an American transgender activist of Puerto Rican and Venezuelan decent. Rivera was a founding member of the Gay Liberation Front and the Gay Activists Alliance, and also helped found STAR (Street Transgender Action Revolutionaries), a group dedicated to helping young homeless trans women.
Rivera was a true revolutionary and one badass lady.

reclaimingthelatinatag:

Sylvia Rivera (2 July 1951 – 19 February 2002) was an American transgender activist of Puerto Rican and Venezuelan decent. Rivera was a founding member of the Gay Liberation Front and the Gay Activists Alliance, and also helped found STAR (Street Transgender Action Revolutionaries), a group dedicated to helping young homeless trans women.

Rivera was a true revolutionary and one badass lady.

(via tranqualizer)


freececemcdonald:

Kicking off a ride out to visit Cece Mcdonald in St. Cloud. When we got to the prison, we were met with SWAT teams at every entrance. Imagine that, prison officials are terrified of solidarity. Wonder why?  Check out freecece.wordpress.com for more info.

freececemcdonald:

Kicking off a ride out to visit Cece Mcdonald in St. Cloud. When we got to the prison, we were met with SWAT teams at every entrance. Imagine that, prison officials are terrified of solidarity. Wonder why?

Check out freecece.wordpress.com for more info.